5 Carat Pear Shaped Diamond Ring

Ultimate guide to buying a 5 carat pear diamond


5 carat pear diamonds are a beautiful choice – they combine the incredible sparkle of a brilliant cut with elongated elegance which looks incredible on the finger.

Pears are one of the less common choices for a 5 carat engagement ring, which means that there may not be a huge selection available when you are looking.

However, that doesn’t mean that you should just settle for the first 5 carat pear diamond you see. This guide will help you avoid sub-par stones and ensure you get a beautiful and brilliant 5 carat pear diamond.

5 carat pear shaped diamonds header image

Key takeaway:

There are many factors that affect price and value of a 5 carat pear diamond and no two pear diamonds are the same, even if the specs on the certificate indicate that they should be.

While it is possible to buy from a large retailer like James Allen, it’s a better idea to work with a specialist in significantly-sized diamonds, who can guide you through the process and ensure you get the most beautiful diamond and pay a fair price.

Our recommendation is Alon at The Diamond Oak, a third generation diamond dealer who puts a huge emphasis on personalised service and finding the right stone for each person.

I recommend you read the testimonials here and then see whether you think that Alon could be a good fit for you.

5 carat pear diamond price

As a broad range, the cost of a 5 carat pear diamond can vary from $54,000 to $263,000.

5 carat pear diamond price

To understand how much a 5 carat pear cut diamond costs, we conducted research across three online diamond aggregation services which collectively have over 1,000,000 diamonds available to choose from, and then checked this against the most widely-accepted list of wholesale diamond prices.

$54,000 to $263,000 is a significant range, and the price you will pay will depend on the color, clarity and the ‘make’ if the stone ie. how well the diamond has been shaped.

With diamonds, you generally get what you pay for, so ‘cheap’ 5 carat pear shaped diamonds will likely have a low-price for a reason – this may be significant inclusions (or ‘flaws’), yellow tinges of color or an undesirable shape.

But, when buying a diamond, there is always a balance that needs to be found between the 4Cs and the fifth C – cost. Where that balance lies for you is an individual choice, so it can be worth looking at a few options to where you are comfortable compromising, and where you aren’t.

How much do 5 carat pear diamonds cost?

The table below will give you an idea of how color and clarity affect a 5 carat diamond’s price:

clarityKJIHGFED
SI2$54,000$46,000$68,000$56,150$67,000$49,000$55,000$79,000
SI1$44,000$53,000$74,000$69,000None$88,000$111,000$122,000
VS2$46,000$77,000$77,000None$140,000$148,000$161,000$181,000
VS1$42,000$69,000$99,000$121,000$148,000$149,000$169,000$131,000
VVS2$68,000$63,000$115,000$114,000$159,000None$209,000$181,000
VVS1$46,000$71,000None$176,000$154,000NoneNone$261,000
IFNoneNone$226,000$126,000$148,000$194,000$204,000$282,000
FLNoneNoneNoneNoneNoneNoneNone$263,000

If a price doesn’t appear, it means that no diamonds at that spec were available at the time this article was written.

It’s important to recognise that at this carat weight, there can be considerable differences between individual stones with similar specs on paper, so these are very much just a guide.

Factors such as availability at the time you are looking, and then specific of the individual diamond (e.g. the L/W ratio) will affect the price of any individual stone. However, the prices quoted should be a good guide to understand the relative pricing of different combinations of color and clarity for 5 carat pear diamonds.

5 carat pear diamond size


Pear diamonds are one of the ‘spreadiest’ shapes of any diamond, which means that for a given carat weight, they appear larger than other shapes.

A typical 5 carat pear diamond may be around 15.47mm × 9.25mm × 5.64mm.

Here’s how it looks compared to a 4 carat and a 6 carat:

5 carat pear diamond size comparison

One important thing to understand when you are looking at 5 carat pear diamonds is that carat weight is a measure of weight rather than size.

Carat weight is therefore spread out throughout the volume of the stone ie. length, width and depth.

This can mean that two 5 carat diamonds can actually appear very different sizes when set into a ring and viewed from the top.

Compared to other shapes, 3 carat pears generally look larger than the-closely related 5 carat heart diamond, but face up smaller than 5 carat oval diamond engagement rings or a marquise diamond at 5 carats, as pears are cut deeper.

5 carat pear diamond L/W ratio

Length-width ratio is, unsurprisingly, the ratio between the length and the width of a diamond:

5 carat pear diamond length width ratio

This can hugely change what a pear shaped diamond looks like

For smaller pear diamonds, I usually recommend a L/W ration of 1.5:1, as this gives an elegant, elongated appearance.

However, for higher carat weights, a longer stone can look too large, and a shorter diamond may be preferable, both from a looks point of view, and cost.

5 carat pear diamond length width comparison

Lower L/W ratio pear diamonds are generally priced lower that higher L/W ratios, as they use more of the rough diamond (which means less needs to be wasted) and there are more of them available (law of supply and demand coming into effect). 

At 5 carats, a L/W ratio of 1.4 – 1.45 will look great on the finger.

Watch out: poorly shaped diamonds

One thing to watch out for with higher carat weight pear shaped diamonds is that they may have been cut with a poor shape, just to make it to 5 carats in weight.

This can result in diamonds that are have overly round sides or square ends, which means that the diamond is heavier and just makes the 5 carat cut-off:

5 carat pear diamonds with poor shape

However, this usually results in a diamond that is not pleasing to the eye and we recommend that you aim for a diamond that hasn’t had these compromises made just to hit the desired carat weight.

5 carat pear diamond color

As you likely know, diamond color is graded on a GIA-developed scale from D to Z, although most diamonds used in jewelry fall into the D to M range:

Color scale

Higher carat weight diamonds tend to show up color more easily than smaller stones, especially in the corners where they sparkle less. With pear diamonds, this is a particular issue in the ‘point’ of the stone, where yellower colors are much more visible than at the other, more rounded end.

If you want to ensure your diamond doesn’t have a yellow tint, it’s important to try and keep the color as high up the scale as possible.

On the other side of the equation is the effect color has on price.

In most shapes, the price difference between an H color, I color and J color diamond can be significant,

With a 5 carat pear, the color grade you choose can be dependant on the color of the ring setting you are going to pair the diamond with. If you are choosing a white colored setting (platinum or white gold), then I color delivers a good balance of white appearance and value.

However, if you are choosing a yellow gold setting, then you can reduce the color of your diamond to J without it looking yellow, as it will still look white compared to the warm tones of the setting.

5 carat pear diamond color recommendation

5 carat pear diamond clarity

Clarity is a measure of the presence of inclusions (or flaws) within a diamond.

The clarity scale runs:

GIA diamond Clarity scale

Pear diamonds are a brilliant cut, which means that they are optimised to reflect light back from the bottom of the stone in the form of brilliant sparkle. This can mean that inclusions can be difficult to see under the facets, which is a good thing!

However, at the same time their elongated shape means they have a large ‘table’ (the flat area on the top of the diamond), which can mean that inclusions located here are easier to see. At higher carat weights, this issue is compounded as a bigger diamond means a bigger window where flaws can be seen.

A good starting point for 5 carat pear diamond clarity is SI1:

5 carat pear diamond clarity

However, depending on the diamonds that are available at the time you are looking, you may need to increase this to VS2, or even higher, to ensure that the diamond is ‘eye clean’ and no flaws can be seen.

Pictures of 5 carat pear diamond rings on the hand

Higher carat weight rings mean that additional considerations can be needed to be taken into account, depending on the ring setting style chosen.

These images of 5 carat pear diamond rings on the finger will show you how big your ring could actually look.

5 carat pear diamond solitaire ring

Solitaire settings are a great match for pear diamonds – the simple style is a great pairing with the elegance of the diamond

5 carat pear solitaire diamond ring

A major trend with settings is super slim and petite bands and prongs, which are effective in making the stone itself look larger.

While these can look great, some care does need to be taken with higher carat weights, as an extremely narrow band may not be wide enough to support the stone. It may twist on the finger and become uncomfortable.

If you’re choosing a solitaire setting to match a 5 carat pear shaped diamond, I recommend you choose a band of at least 2.5mm width.

5 carat pear diamond halo ring

At 5 carats, some may feel that a halo is unnecessary to increase the size and impressiveness of the ring.

5 carat pear halo diamond ring

However, if you do choose a halo for your 5 carat pear ring, ensuring the side stones are a good match for the center stone is essential, due to their proximity.

Even more so than with a pavé or channel setting, working with someone who can color-match the side stones to the center stone is the best way to ensure that they complement each other well.

Best Place To Buy a 5 Carat Pear Shaped Diamond Ring

For smaller carat weights, my recommended retailer is frequently James Allen, which offers a huge selection of stones and can be a good option if you are confident in making a decision yourself.

However, buying a diamond of this size diamond is very different to buying a smaller stone – both in the expense involved and in the potential for pitfalls.

If you feel that you would like some assistance with the purchase (and at this carat weight, that can be a good idea), my recommendation is Alon Mor at The Diamond Oak.

I like this review of his service – it’s worth a read to understand just how special buying a diamond can be.

If you’d like to feel as special as the person in this review, I’d recommend getting in touch with Alon. Let him know you heard of him through Ringspo and he will go above and beyond to make the experience even more special.

Or, if you’d like to send through a direct enquiry with what you’re looking for, just enter your details in the form below: